Tetrarchate - Symposium of the Tetrarchs
Self-released
Thrash Death Metal
4 songs (15'01")
Release year: 2014
Reviewed by Alex

Italian quartet Tetrarchate attempt to put their own individual stamp on thrash metal. From the way what probably is their first official release Symposium of the Tetrarchs sounds, the Italians certainly succeeded in concocting their own brew. Thinking that it would be piece of cake to give you sound analogies, I was actually stomped trying to come up with exact references. First, the four tracks on the EP sound a little dissimilar from each other. Then, throughout symposium of Tetrarchs they combine power chorded thrash riffs, grumbly death vocals and ring in some power metal laser-like leads, so altogether it is not a simple combination to accept in one sitting or to describe in one sentence. Take the opener Scar. At some levels it sounds a little bit like Carcass circa Heartwork, but it is definitely not as enthralling or captivating. The complexity in the guitar torture of Genocide definitely shows the level of technical competence, but the result are still not very memorable. And in thinking that adding a strange speak-over in Massachertorte/Genocide would bring them further memorability and distinction, Tetrarchate are probably mistaken.

Yet, Chant of the Forsaken shows that the Italians can make it all come together. That song has that catchiness and the main melodic hook that ingratiates the song and made me play Chant of the Forsaken for a few times. Alternating punky D-beat, some double bass, the vocals are that dry Carcass cackle again, guitars snarl along or periodically shred at much higher speeds – all elements Tetrarchate tried to combine before work together wonderfully on Chant of the Forsaken, so Symposium of the Tetrarchs does close with a good deal of promise.

Killing Songs :
Chant of the Forsaken
Alex quoted 70 / 100
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